The most important class, however, for me and for hundreds of other Hungarian musicians, was the chamber-music class. From about the age of fourteen, and until graduation from the Academy, all instrumentalists except the heavy-brass players and percussionists had to participate in this course. Presiding over it for many years was the composer Leó Weiner, who thus exercised an enormous influence on three generations of Hungarian musicians.

Sir Georg Solti
Takács Quartet

3 November 2019, 19.30-22.00

Grand Hall

Four by Four

Takács Quartet

Haydn:  String Quartet No. 32 in C major, Hob. III:39 (‘Bird’)
Bartók: String Quartet No. 6, BB 119

intermission

Mendelssohn: String Quartet No. 2 in A minor, Op. 13

Takács Quartet: Edward Dusinberre, Harumi Rhodes (violin), Geraldine Walther (viola), András Fejér (cello)

String Quartet No. 2 in A minor is an important work from Mendelssohn’s late teenage years, composed not solely under the influence of Haydn’s works – like Mozart’s quartets had been before  –  which were considered as the gold standard, but with cutting edge reflections to Beethoven’s late string quartets as well. String Quartet No. 6 is Bartók’s final recapitulation of his works in this genre and also the last work he completed in Europe before  emigrating to the United States with his wife. Like Bartók, four former graduates of the Liszt Academy has been leaving for the United States to form the chamber ensemble in residence at the University of Colorado in 1983. After second violinist Károly Schranz’s leaving in 2018, András Fejér became the only original member of the quartet founded in 1975. This will be their first concert in Budapest in their current lineup.

 

 

The concert is followed by CODA – which is an informal conversation with the performers.

Presented by

Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets:

HUF 1 200, 1 700, 2 800, 3 900

Season ticket:

Four by Four 2019

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