The most important class, however, for me and for hundreds of other Hungarian musicians, was the chamber-music class. From about the age of fourteen, and until graduation from the Academy, all instrumentalists except the heavy-brass players and percussionists had to participate in this course. Presiding over it for many years was the composer Leó Weiner, who thus exercised an enormous influence on three generations of Hungarian musicians.

Sir Georg Solti

Professor Miklós Szabó has passed away

24 June 2020

The retired professor of the Liszt Academy passed away a few weeks after his 89th birthday.

Miklós Szabó was born 15 April 15, 1931 in Szentgotthárd.

He began his teaching career in Győr: from 1953 he taught at the Vocational School of Music, then at the Győr Institute of the Liszt Academy (to be later named the Institute of Music of the Széchenyi István University). From 1979 until his retirement he was a teacher of solfege, music theory and paleography at the Liszt Academy. He was invited as a guest instructor to, and held master classes in many European countries, the United States, Japan, and Israel.

From 1958 until 2009 he was the lead conductor of the Győr Girls' Choir, performing hundreds of concerts at home and abroad. He also released about 30 records with the choir. He conducted the premiere performance of several Hungarian works and popularized early choral music.

He wrote a book on Bartók's children's and women's choirs after publishing a corrected new edition of 27 compositions. Furthermore, he assisted in the compiling of the planned Complete Works of Bartók, Critical Edition.

For his work he was awarded the Ferenc Liszt Prize in 1967, the Meritorious Artist Award in 1978, the Kossuth Prize in 1991, and the Bartók–Pásztory Prize in 1996.

 

Miklós Szabó (photo: MMA)